Worcester Art Museum: Sketches by Travis Simpkins

Sketches of works in the collection of the Worcester art museum - worcester, massachusetts

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In the first photo, Jim Hodges’ 2004 mural, “Don’t Be Afraid”, consisted of those three words written by members of the United Nations in their native languages. Currently the Wall at WAM displays “These Days of Maiuma” by Robert and Shana ParkeHarrison.Then and Now: “Renaissance Court (Wall at WAM)- Worcester Art Museum, 2004 and 2014”. by Travis Simpkins

In the first photo, Jim Hodges’ 2004 mural, “Don’t Be Afraid”, consisted of those three words written by members of the United Nations in their native languages. Currently the Wall at WAM displays “These Days of Maiuma” by Robert and Shana ParkeHarrison.

Then and Now: “Renaissance Court (Wall at WAM)- Worcester Art Museum, 2004 and 2014”. by Travis Simpkins

Filed under Worcester Art Museum then and now Travis Simpkins history photography contemporary modern art jim hodges robert and shana parkeharrison don't be afraid wall at wam mural 2004 2014 Architecture renaissance court public space antioch ancient ancient art Before and After past and present worcesterhistory worcestermassachusetts Worcester artists on tumblr art museum museum collections

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-In the early 20th Century, the Carnegie Steel Company was a major industrial force in the United States, a veritable Goliath. Carnegie’s only able competition was their Pittsburgh neighbor, the Jones & Laughlin Steel Company. When WAM added the Renaissance Court building in the early 1930’s, contractors used steel beams from both rival companies in it’s construction. For what it’s worth, the Carnegie beams seem to have endured the subsequent 80 years slightly better. -Travis Simpkins

-In the early 20th Century, the Carnegie Steel Company was a major industrial force in the United States, a veritable Goliath. Carnegie’s only able competition was their Pittsburgh neighbor, the Jones & Laughlin Steel Company. When WAM added the Renaissance Court building in the early 1930’s, contractors used steel beams from both rival companies in it’s construction. For what it’s worth, the Carnegie beams seem to have endured the subsequent 80 years slightly better. -Travis Simpkins

Filed under carnegie steel jones&laughlin jones & laughlin steel Worcester Art Museum Industrial Revolution industrial history worcesterhistory Worcester worcestermassachusetts steel construction building art museum 1930s pittsburgh

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The first photo, from 1940, shows the Renaissance Court addition of the Worcester Art Museum several years after it was completed. No major aesthetic changes have occurred to the facade in the 74 years between photographs. A trio of tall banners (obscured by the tree branches in the 2014 photo) display current exhibitions over the entrance. The old driveway was widened to form a parking lot, the landscaping has varied slightly over the years and the tree in front of the museum has grown in. In the 2000’s, blue neon stars illuminated the exterior walls at night, but they were taken down a couple years ago.Then and Now: “Salisbury Street Facade (1933 Addition)- Worcester Art Museum, 1940 and 2014”. by Travis Simpkins

The first photo, from 1940, shows the Renaissance Court addition of the Worcester Art Museum several years after it was completed. No major aesthetic changes have occurred to the facade in the 74 years between photographs. A trio of tall banners (obscured by the tree branches in the 2014 photo) display current exhibitions over the entrance. The old driveway was widened to form a parking lot, the landscaping has varied slightly over the years and the tree in front of the museum has grown in. In the 2000’s, blue neon stars illuminated the exterior walls at night, but they were taken down a couple years ago.

Then and Now: “Salisbury Street Facade (1933 Addition)- Worcester Art Museum, 1940 and 2014”. by Travis Simpkins

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The first photo, from 1910, shows a view of the third floor’s East Gallery at the Worcester Art Museum. This photograph (from a glass plate negative) was likely an outtake, considering the abrasions and what appears to possibly be part of the photographer’s dark cloth showing in the frame at far right. It provides a glimpse into the older, more laborious, process of photographing in the galleries. Today, this renovated space houses a rotating selection from WAM’s post-1950 Art collection.Then and Now: “Third Floor (East Gallery)- Worcester Art Museum, 1910 and 2014”. by Travis Simpkins
 
The first photo, from 1910, shows a view of the third floor’s East Gallery at the Worcester Art Museum. This photograph (from a glass plate negative) was likely an outtake, considering the abrasions and what appears to possibly be part of the photographer’s dark cloth showing in the frame at far right. It provides a glimpse into the older, more laborious, process of photographing in the galleries. Today, this renovated space houses a rotating selection from WAM’s post-1950 Art collection.

Then and Now: “Third Floor (East Gallery)- Worcester Art Museum, 1910 and 2014”. by Travis Simpkins

 

Filed under Worcester Art Museum then and now Travis Simpkins history photography modern art exhibit planning exhibition design museum collections art museum Worcester worcesterhistory worcestermassachusetts 20th Century 1910 2014 past and present Before and After artists on tumblr art interior design Architecture

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This Knights! construction photo sequence was documented over the course of nearly 4 months (15 weeks) during the various stages of the Higgins Armory collection installation in the 2nd floor Hiatt Gallery of the Worcester Art Museum. “Helmutt”, the armor-clad dog figure, can be seen in the 11th and 12th images. by Travis Simpkins

This Knights! construction photo sequence was documented over the course of nearly 4 months (15 weeks) during the various stages of the Higgins Armory collection installation in the 2nd floor Hiatt Gallery of the Worcester Art Museum. “Helmutt”, the armor-clad dog figure, can be seen in the 11th and 12th images. by Travis Simpkins

Filed under Worcester Art Museum then and now Travis Simpkins photography exhibit planning exhibition design museum exhibit art museum Higgins Armory knight knight in shining armor helmutt knights arms and armor armor medieval renaissance museum collections museum artists on tumblr gallery installation gallery Worcester worcestermassachusetts worcesterhistory

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Considered by many to be an uninviting entrance to visitors arriving from Lancaster Street, in 2005 demolition began on the old Lancaster Terrace. Here, in the photo at left, the dig is in full swing. Construction of the new stairs and terrace took several months, during which time the Lancaster doors were closed and foot traffic had to be diverted to a side stairwell exit in the Higgins Education Wing.Then and Now: “Lancaster Terrace- Worcester Art Museum, 2005 and 2014”. by Travis Simpkins
 
Considered by many to be an uninviting entrance to visitors arriving from Lancaster Street, in 2005 demolition began on the old Lancaster Terrace. Here, in the photo at left, the dig is in full swing. Construction of the new stairs and terrace took several months, during which time the Lancaster doors were closed and foot traffic had to be diverted to a side stairwell exit in the Higgins Education Wing.

Then and Now: “Lancaster Terrace- Worcester Art Museum, 2005 and 2014”. by Travis Simpkins

 

Filed under Worcester Art Museum then and now Travis Simpkins photography history art history entrance public space lancaster terrace demolition construction art museum Architecture past and present Before and After artists on tumblr Worcester worcesterhistory worcestermassachusetts 2005 2014 bulldozer digging dig excavation